LEGS – LEGS EP

Being categorized as dance music can be very misleading. I personally do like the genre, but I wouldn’t necessarily think to throw LEGS into that arena. With that said, the first track, “High Time,” was not what I was expecting at all. However, I was very pleased with what I heard. These Brooklyn newcomers describe their style as “blending modern indie pop with Stax-worthy hooks…”

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Brand New – Daisy

There’s something to say about Brand New: They can retain their popularity and become one of those few Long Island bands that a good majority of natives are proud to be a fan of (another being, of course, Billy Joel). Daisy, the band’s fourth album since their inception in 2000, has a much more mature and very different sounding feel to it, although it lacks a certain memorable charm and uniqueness as their previous albums.

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Steve Lieberman – Viva the Gangsta Rabbi – Live

Steve Lieberman is a true rocker through and through – and one of the last to have been recorded at the now defunct Downtown in Farmingdale. This live disc was recorded when he opened for the Viva La Bam show. Lieberman is all over the place, borrowing a bit from experimental rockers Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart, British punk rock, such as the Sex Pistols and even ’80s hair metal, creating his own unique sound.

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The Ks – Skunk

The Ks’ newest album Skunk is full of short, power pop gems. The first track, “Turn it Up,” is a rocking tune reminiscent of ’80s metal bands. The vocals of lead singer and guitarist Dan Kilian sound a bit like the lead singer from the Violent Femmes. The next tune, “Baby Why Your Eyes So Wild?,” has a catchy bass line and a catchy melody that is enhanced by the group’s harmonizing vocals.

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Teddy Thompson – Separate Ways

It may have taken British, singer-songwriter Teddy Thompson, who splits his time between England and New York City, six years to come out with his sophomore album, Separate Ways, but it was definitely well worth the wait. Thompson brings in some heavy hitters on this album, including his buddies Martha and Rufus Wainwright, as well as his famous, folkie father, Richard Thompson.

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The Hate My Day Jobs – Demo

There’s nothing revolutionary here, but these guys certainly do what they do very well. And what they do is snotty, garage rock, with the bravado and feedback that brings the listener back 40 years or so. The first track, “Counterpoint,” shows off how incredibly tight the band is, as well as their youthful energy. The lead singer’s vocals display a controlled lack of control that’s effective as he repetitively sings…

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Greg Patane – Demo

Greg Patane’s demo sounds like someone handed an acoustic guitar to the front man from an emo or pop-punk band, a la Dashboard Confessional. Nasally vocals aside, that’s not always a bad thing, as his earnest vocals accompany his heart-on-his-sleeve lyrics and emotionally, energetic guitar playing perfectly. Both songs, “Home, Sweet Broken Home” and “Certainty,” focuses on typical emo fare – the demise of a relationship.

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The Blaque Rose Project – Best of

This female-fronted blues-rock band has what it takes to make it big. In fact, their sound is reminiscent of Antigone Rising, fellow locals whose fan base, which includes The Rolling Stones, continues to grow daily. The darker elements of the band’s sound bring to mind the melodies of harder rock bands. The first song, “Run,” has a very dark, almost gothic feel that is further enhanced by the lead singer’s brazen and husky vocals.

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